Tag Archives: photography

Super 8 Cinemagraphs

A little while ago I did a post about Cinemagraphs, animated gifs that look like living photographs. I loved how, by introducing a subtle amount of movement, they seemed to heighten the sense of suspended animation inherent in still photographs:

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At the time I mentioned I was keen to see if I could use this approach to animate sections of some old super 8 film I was working with. I’ve since had questions on how that went, and having just found a few of my early tests on my old hard drive I thought I put them up. They’re not great, I found the innate flickering nature of celluloid film that we know and love means it’s technically pretty difficult to create a seamless link between static image and animation. However, I think they were an important stepping stone in developing a body of work combining analogue film and printmaking techniques and digital editing methods which would eventually become Flicker, an analogue film/instillation piece I will do a longer post on sometime.

I’m happiest with these first two, I love how the figures spring to life briefly in a ‘blink and you miss it’ kind of way. However they need a lot of refining before they are seamless.

crowd

Crowd2

In these final two you can see the problem with trying to make cinemagraphs out of footage you have not shot yourself. You really need the stability and consistency of digital equipment to make it illusion really effective. Although maybe using footage shot it the cockpit of a WWII german bomber was being a bit ambitious to start with!

Talking-pilotbombs-away

These are from a body of work I created while looking at ways of reusing old analogue film, you can see more work in my portfolio.

It formed the basis for a film Instillation Flicker which was first shown during my MA show, and excerpt of which can be watched in my portfolio.

If you’re interested in making your own I used some of the tutorials you can find in this Inspiration Feed Article.

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Sector 17 – photography and concept art

SECTOR 17_002

William Winston in Sector 17

I know how William’s feeling here, it’s been a busy few weeks in Aberystwyth, as well as my final show going up I was thrilled to be approached by 2Grand Productions to do some graphic design and photography work for their first ever show, Sector 17. Here’s what happened:

Sector 17 is a musical set in a post apocalyptic Britain of the future, ravaged by war and struggling under a crushing authoritarian regime, headed up my the sinister, (but strangely charismatic) Mac (Matthew Duckett):

Mac played by Mathew Duckett

Mac played by Mathew Duckett

Personally, I think it’s the pipe and smoking jacket that does it.

The story follows William Winston (a nod to Orwell’s 1984 maybe?) (Gareth Tilley) whose research into potential life outside the Sector has made him a target not only for Mac’s authoritarian regime but the elusive underground group The Rebellion.  Headed up by Darcourt (Myles Mccmorrow) and aided by the hot headed Georgia (Harriet Taylor) the rebellion are looking to topple Mac’s rule for good.

William played by Gareth Tilley

William played by Gareth Tilley

Darcourt played by Myles Mcmorrow

Darcourt played by Myles Mcmorrow

Georgia played by Harriet Taylor

Georgia played by Harriet Taylor

Caught between Mac and Darcourt and with time running out, William must ask himself, is this really the life he was searching for?

With elements of George Orwell’s 1984, Terry Gilliam’s BrazilFritz Lang’s Metropolis and Fallout 3, I didn’t know how such dark subject mater would lend itself to a musical. However, with songs ranging from epic Enter Shikari-esque ballads to 50’s rock and roll, the music worked brilliantly.

Here are some photos of my favourite number, in which Georgia has been taken to the dreaded Block B, the inmates an estranged mix between harpies and rag dolls and watched over by sinister harlequin-mask clad guards. The macabre carnival style music, reminiscent of the The Strangler’s was offset perfectly with the choreography of Hannah Lester.

SECTOR 17_081

SECTOR 17_082

For the Posters I decided to go with a Russian Constructivist style, Soviet lettering alongside block shapes and colours. In the launch event poster we wanted to get a sense of the turmoil within Sector 17 without giving too much of the story away. The main poster is my take on Rodchenko’s classic, I felt the idea of the human voice as a means of protest gelled well with the story and its format as a musical.

Teaser poster for the ticket launch event of Sector 17

Teaser poster for the ticket launch event of Sector 17

Sector 17 Poster

Sector 17 Poster

Russian Constructivist poster by Rodchenko
The whole cast was really strong, check them out in the full range of photo’s from the show on the Performance Photography section of my blog:

SECTOR 17_100

Sector 17 was staged at the Arad Goch theatre in Aberystwyth.
Original Concept, Music and Lyrics by Sam Barnes and Jack Gayler
For more music from Sam Barnes, please visit www.soundcloud.com/sambarnes7
Book by Sam Barnes, Hannah McCombie and Jack Gayler
Directed by Adam Lacey

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Performance Photography

A little while ago I was asked to collaborate with a number of MA Performance Studies students on their final projects. It was great to be part of the culmination of their hard work and really made me consider my own position going into my final year with exhibitions on the horizon. Each was stunning, engage and unique, here are some of the results.

 De Keersmaeker’s Apprentice: FootstepsRuth Hayward

photograph of Ruth Hayward's performance 'Footsteps' by Ben Partridge
Alongside the photos Ruth and I created a stopmotion animation that formed part of her performance, which I’ll try to upload soon.

EditedSean Payne

KleinLeapIntoVoid

Taking Yves Klein iconic photograph of the same name (above) as it’s starting point, Leap into the Void sought to explore the way documentation can be exploited to instill a narrative with a sense of authenticity. The shoot was an eventful one, culminating in a telling off from the head of campus security (who just so happened to be an ex-paratrooper).

Photograph of Sean Payne's Performance 'Leap into a Void' by Ben Partridge

The performance began with the audience being brought outside to watch the Sean and I recreate the photograph. This involved taking two photographs  from exactly the same spot (see below), the first with Sean jumping onto a crash mat and the second with the crash mat removed, the images were then combined on photoshop. Incidentally, Klein didn’t use a crash mat when creating his image but had a group of (trusted!) judo friends to catch him.

Photograph of Sean Payne's Performance 'Leap into a Void' by Ben Partridge

Photograph of Sean Payne's Performance 'Leap into a Void' by Ben Partridge

Long OddsHannah Lester

Long Odds was a performance almost completely dictated by chance, the lighting, music, actions and duration was all decided upon by the roll of a die, flip of a coin or an audience member at random. This performance really took me out of my comfort zone, not from a photography point of view but because Hannah also asked me to play guitar in it, something I had never done in front of an audience before!

Photograph of Hannah Lester's Performance 'Long Odds' by Ben Partridge
While I didn’t work with them on this occasion, two other performances that really blew me away were Christina Scarillo’s (below) and Chris Stacey’s ‘Eternal soundtrack of the spotless mind’.

photograph of Cristina Sciarrillo - Ben Partridge

More images in the gallery below and on my Performance Photography page, Copyright Ben Partridge 2012
ex. Yves Klein ‘leap into a Void’, duh.

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Cinemagraphs

If you asked me yesterday about animated Gifs, this would have been what came to mind:

psycho gif animation

funny frog gif animation

Now I love a drumming monkey as much as the next guy but, as hard as I try, I can’t seem to justify these as serious research. However these are the predecessors to the collaborative cinemagraphs of photographer Jamie Beck and motion graphics artist Kevin Burg. Cinemagraphs present themselves as photo’s with moving elements. The results can be subtle and captivating.
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Somewhere between a photograph and a video I think what makes these cinemagraphs so effective is that it maintains photography’s innate ability to capture a moment, freezing it in time. The introduction of movement to these images seems to enhance this rather than dispel it. I believe this is in part down the the looping of the animation, whether the effect is hilarious or relaxing there  is something satisfying about seeing it over and over.

\"Jamie

Animated gifs have been around since the late 80’s, and are a way of combining multiple frames played in sequence into a single image file. Previously seen as a bit of an internet novelty, their ability to capture your attention and question what you are seeing could have a large impact on an area as saturated with imagery as online advertising.

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I can see this as a potential way of re-animating some of my Super 8 films, by reintroducing a small amount of repeating movement into the frames this will enhance their ‘stuck in time’ quality. here are a few of the stills I am thinking of using from a documentary film of WWI depicting soldiers in the trenches and a bombing raid on an airfield.

Still from WWI film showing Soliders in the trenches

WWI film still showing soliders going over the top into shell fire

A WWI film still showing a soldier running across an airfield

More film stills can be found on my website.
For more info see this video by PBS arts’ Off Book.

Cinemagraphs from Inspiration feed, check them out for more examples and useful links.

Also worth a look of your into  films: IWDRM (but not if you want to do anything useful with the next hour of your day!).

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Pinhole photographs

Just been getting into pinhole photography, something I’ve always wanted to try but never had the time. Initially I was scared off the idea by long, boring online articles about the importance of precision drilling apertures to a fraction of a mm. For me this seems like a lot of effort for something you’ve made out of a beer can and duct tape. Luckily pinhole Photographer Justin Quinnell has some straight forward instructional stuff on his website and a couple of good Youtube videos.
These are the cameras I’ve made so far.

Pinhole Camera, Beer can Camera, Film canister Camera

The black box makes paper negatives about 15x15cm,  the film canister roughly 5x7cm and the beer can take 5×7″ paper.

They all produce negative images (like the one bellow) which you can scan and invert on Photoshop or just leave them as they are because the look all spooky.

Pin hole photograph negative Beer can camera

It’s the curve of the paper in the film canister and beer can produces that really cool distorted wide angle effect.


All the photos were taken in Aberystwyth School of Art, partly because it’s a amazing building to photograph and partly because I’m lazy and didn’t want to walk to far from the darkroom. I hope to develop them further and enter some into the exhibition ‘Culture’ which asks printmakers to create prints to be displayed in petri dishes and will tour Wales later this year.

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